Get Your Rotating Equipment Ready for the New Year

rotating equipment repair

Don’t waste time worrying about the operation of your pumps, gearboxes and other rotating equipment in 2017. This year, get ahead and minimize your total maintenance and operation costs by taking care of repairs early. OTP Industrial Solutions’ factory-trained technicians specialize in industrial equipment and pump repair services and are on standby at our local, in-house repair shops to bring your rotating equipment back to spec.

Consider the following pump and gearbox repairs to make sure your rotating equipment runs properly and efficiently all year long while minimizing your Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF).

Equipment Balancing

Test and balance rotating elements ¬— individually or as an assembled unit — to increase the life of your rotating equipment. This helps prevent premature bearing failures while reducing damaging shaft deflection, and it will help increase the overall life of your equipment.

Machining

Now is the perfect time to repair any equipment that could use some fabrication or modification. Whether it needs rebowling, surface grinding or line shaft couplings, staying ahead of equipment repairs can save you from a huge headache later in the year.

The full-service machine shops at OTP specialize in fabrication and modification of parts and assemblies to best support the needs of our repair facilities and customers.

Preventative Maintenance and Equipment Monitoring

Monitoring your rotating equipment will ensure that your operations run smoothly all year long. You can also minimize downtime this year by getting long-term support through a preventive maintenance plan.

When you choose OTP Industrial Solutions as your local pump and gearbox repair shop, you are guaranteed a quality repair — on time and on budget. Start your year off right! Contact the experts at OTP or visit one of our repair shops to discuss your repair needs.

Custom Fabrication Services for Manufacturers

Did you know OTP Industrial Solutions can fabricate custom skids for its customers?

OTP can custom design a pump equipment skid to fit your unique requirements. We start with your unique specifications and then create computer-aided design (CAD) drawings in-house. From these drawings, we fabricate and assemble the skid. This results in a professional, high quality custom fabrication that meets your exact needs.

Check out a recent custom skid package completed by our shops:
Custom Skid

If your operation needs a custom solution, contact the OTP experts today!

OTP Service Team Transforms Falk Gear Reducer

Falk Gear Reducer Repair

The OTP service team transformed a Falk Gear reducer into top shape!

Following OTP’s Rebuild Philosophy, the service team:

  • Fixed it on time
  • Fixed it on budget
  • Looked for the root cause
  • Fixed it right the first time

OTP manages in-house local repair shops with factory-trained technicians so customers don’t have to worry about the operation of their pumps and gearboxes. OTP keeps rotating equipment running correctly and efficiently while minimizing its total lifetime maintenance and operation costs.

OTP repairs all brands of pumps, gearboxes and rotating equipment. Technicians at our local pump and gearbox repair facilities will earn your confidence with their professional, personal, technical support and our quality pump and gearbox turnaround.

If your equipment needs to be repaired or serviced, contact the OTP experts today!

 

OTP Pump Repair Service Exceeds Customer Expectation

pump repair service
After OTP pump repair service

The OTP Repair Service team astounds a customer with quick, quality service.

The customer had two large Flowserve vertical turbine pumps critical to the plant operations, that were in need of repair. It required two rebuilds and startup within a tight, eight-day timeframe. The customer reached out to the OTP Middletown, Ohio, service center for help.

The Flowserve pumps were completely rebuilt back to OEM specification, within budget and five days ahead of schedule. The customer was thrilled with OTP’s performance in exceeding its expectations.

The customer stated, “Saving money is always a top priority, but ‘Top Notch Service’ means a lot to me, and your team performed!”

OTP repairs all brands of pumps, gearboxes and rotating equipment. If your equipment needs to be repaired or serviced, contact the OTP experts today!

before pump repair service
Before
after pump repair service
After

Pump Repair: In-House Vs. Sending Out

From ipegstl.com

In today’s economic climate, everyone is looking for ways to cut costs and/or improve efficiencies—whether it’s buying a car with better gas mileage to save on fuel spending or replacing leaky windows in your home to improve energy efficiency and save electricity. Call it being “green” if you like. It’s no different in today’s industrial plants. Companies want to run their equipment more efficiently and save money on energy costs. One great way to do this is to consider sending your rotating equipment to an outside vendor for pump repair.

Today’s industrial plants may run into many hurdles while repairing equipment in-house. These hurdles make it difficult to repair equipment to A-1 condition. Problems may include:

  1. Lack of Personnel. Cut backs on maintenance professionals don’t allow plants to devote as much time to equipment repair as they would like.
  2. Lack of Precision Tools. Many plants today lack the necessary tools needed to complete a precision repair.
  3. Lack of Time. This corresponds to number one above as well as inventory issues. When equipment goes down, many plants don’t have the time needed for precision repair.

Sending equipment for pump repair to an outside vendor allows companies to avoid most of the hurdles mentioned above. First and foremost . . .

Continue reading at ipegstl.com.

CONSIDER CONVERTING TO A CARTRIDGE MECHANICAL SEAL

By Todd McMonigle

When repairing a pump that currently has a component mechanical seal* (or packing**), it is worth considering upgrading to a cartridge mechanical seal design. Component seals include multiple parts (rotor, rotor face, stationary face, springs, O-rings, gaskets, and seal gland) that require considerable handling and also require more care and skill during installation. For this reason you can incur potentially more assembly errors, including wrong spring setting—and therefore improperly loaded faces, dirt or grease contamination on sealing faces, damage to sealing components from mishandling, and sometimes just plain forgetting to use a needed part (like omitting a gland gasket…been there!). Any of these will result in immediate or early failure of the mechanical seal.  (Note: It is always a good idea to air test—at 25 psig—a rebuilt pump on the bench prior to putting it back into service).

On the other hand, a cartridge seal is a FULLY pre-assembled mechanical seal. It includes all of the parts mentioned above in the component seal (plus a seal sleeve), but in a prepackaged, preset, factory assembled and factory-TESTED product. All of the potential issues mentioned above with a component seal are eliminated with a cartridge seal. As with any mechanical seal installation, however, careful attention must be paid to proper installation practices and techniques—regardless of whether it’s a component or cartridge seal. Also, cartridge mechanical seals can sometimes require additional seal chamber clearance or axial space requirements; that is another reason to consider upgrading during a pump rebuild, when you have the tools and machining capabilities readily at hand (if needed).

OTHER ADVANTAGES OF CARTRIDGE SEALS

  • Installation time is reduced considerably compared to a component seal installation
  • Seals come with installation grease, tools, a detailed drawing, and sometimes extra set screws and O-ring materials
  • Multiple features, seal designs, materials, single and double configurations, and internal interchangeability
  • Most manufacturers offer “half-price” repair programs or exchanges, often regardless of the poor condition of the seal
  • Manufacturers also provide further deep discounts on new seals when converting a competitor’s cartridge seal

For more information about component and cartridge mechanical seals, contact an OTP Industrial Solutions expert. Our team takes pride in the technical knowledge and broad product support we provide to help our customers build and maintain top performing industrial systems.

*Mechanical Seal – precision sealing device used to virtually eliminate process fluid leakage (as
low as 3 drops/day) along the pump shaft or other process equipment shaft.

**Packing – early method of sealing the pump shaft by means of compressing or squeezing
together multiple flexible rings or “ropes” to create a seal. Generally leakage rates are required to
be a minimum of 60 drops/minute and are often times much greater. Packing is still used today
quite extensively.

WHY IS SHAFT ALIGNMENT IMPORTANT AND HOW DOES IT AFFECT SERVICE LIFE OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT?

By Matt Crankshaw

Shaft alignment is an important step in the setup of new or repaired pumps and gearboxes.

Some of the potential problems that may arise from not properly aligning rotating equipment includes:

• Excessive vibration and noise
• High overhung loads on bearings, which can lead to premature failure
• Non-uniform wear on mechanical seals or packing
• Accelerated wear to shaft couplings

Shafts may be misaligned in three separate ways; parallel, angular and axial. Misalignments can occur during shipping, after new installations or from vibrations during equipment run time.

To ensure the highest level of accuracy when performing shaft alignments, OTP technicians use lasers. The lasers are mounted on the shafts of the equipment to be aligned. As the shafts are rotated, the lasers measure the deflection of the shafts and calculate how many shims to add to get the correct alignment. This method of alignment is the most accurate and repeatable.

Protect your pumps and rotating equipment by aligning them properly and you will be rewarded with increased uptime and lower overall maintenance costs. Please contact OTP Industrial Solutions to experience our precise shaft alignment and other rotating equipment repair services.

WHEN TO USE DYNAMIC EQUIPMENT BALANCING TO INCREASE SERVICE LIFE

By Rod Garing

WHEN SHOULD I GET MY EQUIPMENT BALANCED?

Equipment needs to be balanced when it’s new or has been pulled for rebuilding or repair.

It is critical that new equipment is balanced to ensure a long trouble-free service life. Differences in castings, including voids, density and porosity, can contribute to unbalanced rotors on new equipment. Machining and fabrication tolerances also play a role in unbalanced rotors.

Equipment that has been in service for an extended period of time can develop an unbalanced rotor. Buildup from deposits, corrosion and wear contribute to this unbalance.  Cavitation in pumps can also accelerate an unbalanced condition.

WHY IS EQUIPMENT BALANCING SO IMPORTANT?

Unbalanced rotors cause stress on the supporting structure of the equipment—this includes bearings, seals and shafting. Bearings will experience an increased load resulting in decreased service life. Unbalanced rotors also produce vibration, which causes a number of issues. Vibration may cause seal faces to separate or cause bounce resulting in cracked faces and seal failure. Vibration also increases fretting under the oil seals and mechanical seals resulting in shaft damage.

Dynamic balancing minimizes stress and vibration in order to increase service life of the equipment. It is one of the most cost effective ways to provide value to industrial equipment owners.

OTP Industrial Solutions is pleased to assist equipment owners with their dynamic balancing requirements. Please contact us to discuss your balancing needs.

HOW TO IDENTIFY COMMON EQUIPMENT ISSUES PRIOR TO FAILURE

By Rob McPherson

Identifying equipment issues prior to equipment failure prevents the need to replace a complete unit. If an operator checks for the following common signs during the operation of a pump or gearbox, it may allow for greater reliability leading to savings in a reduction of unplanned downtime and an economical repair of a unit verses a complete unit replacement.

Misalignment

One common sign of potential equipment failure is misalignment of a coupled pump to the motor or a gearbox to the drive component. A pump can also be damaged if either the inlet or outlet is misaligned due to pipe strain. Misalignment allows the bearings to fail prematurely leading to heavy vibrations as described in the section below. Correct installation, including laser alignment after the unit has ran for a short period of time, will assure proper loads on the bearings per the manufacturer design points. Periodic inspection including alignment checks assist in preventing equipment failure. If a unit is found to be out of alignment after running for a period of time, it is recommended the unit be inspected to assure no additional damage has occurred as a result of the misalignment.

Vibration

Determining vibration levels at start-up, during operation and timely intervals throughout the life of a unit is an integral part of identifying a problem before it becomes a major failure. Early vibration detection in rotating equipment provides a sign of forthcoming failure. Within a pump, vibration can be a sign of cavitation, impeller erosion, improperly balanced impeller, loose shaft, failed bearings or a coupling issue. Within a gearbox, this early detection can be a sign of a damaged gear or failed bearings.

Efficiency

Decreased efficiencies within an operating system can also be a sign of a problem within a pump. Pumps are designed to run at the best efficiency point (BEP), the point where a pump provides the most cost-effective operation with energy efficiency and maintenance. By using a flow meter, one can monitor the efficiency of a pump system and assist in determining changes within the unit, such as increased wear ring clearances requiring inspection and/or repair.

Lubrication

Monitoring rotating equipment’s lubrication system and completing oil analysis can provide an early indication of equipment problems. Oil can display signs of increased heat, contamination from the product and bearing life. Proper oil analysis can also provide a cost savings in oil usage if the oil shows no signs of problems.

While the above are not the only indicators of forthcoming problems with rotating equipment, each is a place to begin to assist in preventing unplanned downtime and catastrophic failures. Repair costs can be limited the earlier a unit is removed from service and inspected due to misalignment, increased vibrations, decreased efficiencies and oil/lubrication monitoring.

OTP Industrial Solutions is pleased to assist with the inspection of alignment, vibration monitoring and oil analysis. Contact your local OTP sales representative or office location to discuss your rotating equipment needs for additional resources and assistance.

Quarry Pumps with Excessive Vibration

OTP Industrial Solutions for Pump Repair
Written by Tom Bland
September 15, 2009

quarry-pumpsWe received a call from a large stone quarry requesting a budget quote to rebuild a 200 HP, 4-stage vertical turbine pump used for quarry dewatering. We visited the site to review the installation and to gather additional information as to the nature of the problem. While driving deep into the quarry, the site manager explained that these pumps were mounted ten feet above the normal high level and would draw down to 23 feet to the minimum level. The pumps are also mounted on a mezzanine-like structure. This high mounting distance, and the mezzanine mounting was necessary to prevent flooding of the motors should the quarry lose power or experience an abnormally heavy rainfall.

As we climbed the stairs to the top of the structure, the excessive vibration became very evident. In fact, the whole structure had such severe vibration that we questioned the ability of the welds and fasteners to keep it together!

Although the pumps were clearly causing excessive vibration, we decided to confirm the pumps were correctly sized for the job before we assumed that a rebuild was required.

After gathering the necessary information including the pump discharge pressure of 70 psi and the distance from the gauge to the water level, we then compared the actual operating conditions against the design conditions.

The design condition was 2200 gpm at 250 feet of head with a requirement of 34 feet of net positive suction head (NPSH).

Calculated NPSH available:
33 ft. atmospheric pressure
– 1 ft. vapor pressure at 75F
+ 3 ft. minimum submergence of bowl assembly at low level cut-off
——————
35 ft. NPSH available

The NPSH available is barely sufficient for the design condition requirement of 34 feet, but more than ample for higher water levels. But is the pump operating at design condition?

70 psi discharge pressure x 2.31 = 162 ft. head
Distance from gauge to low water level = 23 ft.
Operating condition 185 ft. head

Referring to the pump curve, at 185 ft. hd. this pump will deliver 2600 gpm with 50 ft. of NPSH required! The NPSH required (50 ft.) exceeds the NPSH available (35 ft.) by 15 ft.

At run-out, or maximum flow, of 2860 gpm at 141 ft. head, this pump requires 72 ft. of NPSH. It was clear that cavitation was the cause of the vibration.

Returning to the pump, we throttled the discharge valve to return the pump to the original design condition and as expected, the vibration disappeared. This unit also operates in parallel with additional pumps. When all three pumps are running, the total discharge head (TDH) is sufficient to restrict the flow and keep the pump near the original design point. But operation of this pump alone or with only one additional pump will always require close monitoring and throttling to prevent excessive wear or failure due to cavitation.

By reviewing the installation prior to removal, we prevented an unnecessary rebuild on this VTP pump.

Proper selection of all design conditions is critical to correct pump selection. In this real world example, the VTP pump supplier did not consider that the pump may be operated beyond the design condition. In fact most pumps operate outside of their design condition as they are typically oversized for worst case conditions.

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